Authors of The Eaten Path

James Boo

New York City
James Boo - The Eaten Path

James is the founder of The Eaten Path. He was inspired to write about food after completing a two-week BBQ road trip through the South, and tends to define best meals in terms of how thoroughly he had to wash his hands when done. His best memories involve pork, coffee, and Ben Sisko.

James is now a documentary filmmaker, focused on stories of the certainly non-epic. His micro-documentary project, 1 Minute Meal, has won several awards and is slated to conclude in 2016. His first feature-length film, Nothing With Something, is almost done with the festival circuit and will be publicly viewable soon. He is currently in pre-production for a new documentary that has nothing to do with food. Follow along with his work at jamesboo.com

Zach Mann

Los Angeles
Zach Mann - The Eaten Path

Zach joined The Eaten Path in 2009 and redesigned the site in 2012. He believes the fastest way to understanding a city is through honest, regular meals of varying ordinariness. Zach is convinced that food tastes better when the grill cook or wait staff makes him smile. For him, the background of the meal is the foreground of the story.

Zach is now a PhD student in English Literature at the University of Southern California. Having moved mostly to the other side of the publishing desk, he works as Managing Editor at the online literary journal The Offing and as Noir & Mystery Editor at the Los Angeles Review of Books. He rarely writes on food these days, but he still dreams to one day publish the definitive book on diners in American film.

Vicky Lai

Travels to Japan and Taiwan
Vicky Lai - The Eaten Path

A fan of farmer’s markets and foam art on her coffee, Vicky feels like a clichéd foodie. She loves to pass the time looking at photos of pastries, as any proper food porn addict should.

After growing up in Fremont, California, Vicky spent her formative food years in Los Angeles, exploring a lot of random Latin food. She then spent one great year in the United Kingdom, where her fondness for mushy peas, cider and Pimm’s (both summer and winter varieties) was developed. Vicky contributed a series of stories while working in Beijing, editing and doing economic research but traveling to Japan and Taipeiin her free time in the eternal hunt for the yummy.

Tyler Luiten

Bonn, Germany
Tyler Luiten - The Eaten Path

Many dream of vast riches, fancy cars, or living a rock-star life. Tyler dreams of babaganoush, burritos, outdoor food markets, and how many different things one can cook in a tagine.

A native of the beautiful Pacific Northwest, Tyler moved to the San Francisco bay area for college, where his passion for food blossomed. He eventually decided to earn his PhD in Madison, WI, and as a part of that process moved to Bonn, Germany, where he investigated the tantalizing nuances of dead Germanic languages and the German appetite. Tyler enjoys comparing European food culture to that of America, and is overjoyed when he is introduced to new foods not commonly found back home.

Stephen Shull

Palma, Spain
Stephen Shull - The Eaten Path

Stephen was born in Los Angeles, California. In 2008 he moved to Palma, Spain, on the island of Majorca, where he worked as an assistant teacher at a secondary school and as a private English tutor. During this time he also contributed a series of columns to The Eaten Path on the food and drink of his new home. He has since relocated to New York to work full time as a Latin teacher.

While not obsessing over obtuse issues of language, Stephen drowns his sorrows in Minorcan gin and low-quality beer, and finds the occasional respite in the abundant and inexpensive fresh fruits, vegetables and pork products that the island of Majorca bestows upon those blessed to call her home.

Chi Tung

Shanghai, China
Chi Tung - The Eaten Path

Chi hails from sunny Santa Barbara and wrote for The Eaten Path during his time in Shanghai, where he hosted a science and tech show without a hint of technical knowledge or irony. In his ample free time, he moonlights as a writer, foodie, and amateur karaokephile.

Though his Northern Chinese roots reveal a soft spot for noodles and savory pancakes, Chi isn’t above the occasional all-you-can-handle Japanese buffet. He also delights in crackpot metaphors and references to Ping Pong Playa, which he maintains is Chinese America’s answer to Anchorman.

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