Single Serving: Shiro Miso Ramen at Ramen Misoya in the East Village, Manhattan

by James Boo on February 8, 2012 · 1 comment

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New York’s ramen rage has finally gotten to the point where an East Village spot can sustain itself on miso ramen alone – and I couldn’t be more grateful.

Ramen Misoya, a Japanese brand that pulls strands of miso ramen from their Japanese locales, opened a New York branch at the peak of last Autumn. Of the three types of blended miso broths on offer – kome, shiro, and nama – kome is the most distinctly tasty, especially when ordered spicy. I find myself, however, coming back to the shiro (listed as “white miso, Kyoto style”) on repeat visits. The broth, slightly sweet and unassumingly rich, shimmers on the surface. A pork-chicken-miso blend with hints of garlic and ginger, it’s a cozy departure from more robust pork broths – flavorful without too much intensity, filling without too much weight.

The seal to the deal is Misoya’s choice of topping for its “shiro basic”: a large pinch of bean sprouts, a tablespoon of heartily marinated ground pork, a nice afterthought of cabbage, and two magnificent cubes of fried tofu. When the ramen arrives, the bottom of each cube has already soaked up more broth than it can handle, but the delicate construction holds together. Each bite of tofu is firm. Each crisp, unexposed edge is a delightful precursor to a warming respite.

Ramen Misoya
129 Second Ave.
New York, NY 10003
212.677.4825

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Nathan Chan February 15, 2012 at 8:56 pm

Another great entry. Out here in the San Francisco Bay Area, Misoya also opened up here amid the ramen craze that has been hitting this region over the last 2 years. Prior to visiting Misoya, people here including myself had been accustomed to the very popular tonkotsu broth base, so the introduction of Misoya and their miso was a bit of a departure. That said, I’m curious as to how consistent the east and west coast branches are as far as taste and recipe are concerned.

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